MEET THE FACES MAKING YOUR PIECES

 

 

We all love the pieces in our wardrobe, but rarely do we stop and ask, who made them? Do you know where your favourite pair of heels, that gorgeous new knit for winter or the handbag you use every day came from?
 
More importantly, did the people making them – usually young women – receive a fair wage and decent working conditions to do so?
 
It’s Fashion Revolution Week – which means you can’t escape the question #whomademyclothes this week. Instagram is flooded with the hashtag.
 
Fashion Revolution Week was launched following the Rana Plaze collapse in 2013, where a garment factory in Bangladesh collapsed killing over 1100 workers. The big issue with Rana Plaza is the level of exposition that was taking place, so consumers like us could have cheap, ‘fast fashion’.
 
Despite the building having visible cracks and workers expressing concerns it was unsafe, they were forced inside to complete orders for global fashion brands. There were being paid a maximum of 24 cents an hour to do so. That’s a wage of $12.48 per week. When it collapsed, there was no way out. They were trapped.
 
Now I’m sure you feel the same as me. I am horrified at the thought of another human dying so I can have a new shirt.
 
This is one of the reasons I started Zurii. I wanted to have beautiful pieces in my life, but I didn't want someone else suffering so I could have them. It was almost impossible to find out where leading brands were making their products and if they were paying their workers a living wage. I vowed to have a label based on transparency.
 
So today, I want to introduce you to some of the amazing people making your Zurii pieces.
 
MEET KEVINE & EUNICE

These two women are entrepreneurial powerhouses who handcraft many of our jewellery pieces.  
 

MEET JALASE & RISTI

This lovely couple work together to create some of our key leather goods pieces, including the Cara Boho bag below. 

 


 
When you choose a Zurii piece you can rest easy knowing it has been handcrafted with love, and the hands that made it were valued, well paid and working in a safe environment. Now that is good fashion!

You can find your favourite piece here.  SHOP THE COLLECTION 


Patrice Gibbons
Patrice Gibbons

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